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Find a Random images for your creative needs, desktop wallpaper or Android device. Random forests or random decision forests are an ensemble learning method for classification, regression and other tasks, that operate by constructing a multitude of decision trees at training time and outputting the class that is the mode of the classes (classification) or mean prediction (regression) of the individual trees. Random decision forests correct for decision trees' habit of overfitting to their training set. The first algorithm for random decision forests was created by Tin Kam Ho using the random subspace method, which, in Ho's formulation, is a way to implement the "stochastic discrimination" approach to classification proposed by Eugene Kleinberg. An extension of the algorithm was developed by Leo Breiman and Adele Cutler, and "Random Forests" is their trademark. The extension combines Breiman's "bagging" idea and random selection of features, introduced first by Ho and later independently by Amit and Geman in order to construct a collection of decision trees with controlled variance.In probability and statistics, a random variable, random quantity, aleatory variable, or stochastic variable is a variable whose possible values are numerical outcomes of a random phenomenon. As a function, a random variable is required to be measurable, which rules out certain pathological cases where the quantity which the random variable returns is infinitely sensitive to small changes in the outcome. It is common that these outcomes depend on some physical variables that are not well understood. For example, when you toss a coin, the final outcome of heads or tails depends on the uncertain physics. Which outcome will be observed is not certain. Of course the coin could get caught in a crack in the floor, but such a possibility is excluded from consideration. The domain of a random variable is the set of possible outcomes. In the case of the coin, there are only two possible outcomes, namely heads or tails. Since one of these outcomes must occur, either the event that ...
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